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and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2